Family and Support Services – Eliminate City Funding for After School and Summer Employment Programs

Savings: $6.5 million

The 2011 Budget includes $6.5 million in City funding for after school and summer employment programs administered by After School Matters (ASM).[1]  The City funding supplements federal Workforce Investment Act (WIA) grants that the City uses to provide similar programs.  Between 2007 and 2009, the City’s WIA grants averaged $40 million a year.[2]

Under this option, the City would eliminate City funding for after school and summer employment programs, saving $6.5 million annually.

Proponents might argue that the City cannot afford to fund after school and summer employment programs in the current fiscal climate and that the need for such programming is diminished if the Mayor’s proposal to extend the school day by 90 minutes is instituted.  The federal funding that supports these programs can alone ensure that the students with the most need will continue to receive funding.  Additionally, others might argue that a recent study of the impact of ASM found that it has no impact on “marketable job skills or academic outcomes”.[3] Opponents might argue that investments in programming for youth are among the most cost-effective social service spending.  After school programs have been shown to reduce the juvenile crime rate. [4]  The same study on ASM referenced in the proponents section found that ASM did have positive impacts on “positive youth development and problem behaviors”.[5]

 

Budget Details

Dept: Finance General, 099 Bureau:  NA
Fund: Corporate Fund, 0100 Approp Code: 9011,  Summer Jobs Programs

9030, After School Programs

The appropriation is located on pg. 255 of the 2011 Annual Appropriation Ordinance. http://www.cityofchicago.org/content/dam/city/depts/obm/supp_info/2011BudgetOrdinance.pdf

[1] City of Chicago. Contract Number 24689.

[2] City of Chicago. 2007 thru 2009 Single Audits- Report on Federal Awards.

http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/fin/supp_info/report_on_federalawards.html

[3] Hirsch, Barton  J., Hedges, Larry V., Stawicki, Julie Ann, Mekinda, Megan A.“After-School Programs for High School Students An Evaluation of After School Matters”. June 2011. pg. 4

http://www.wallacefoundation.org/knowledge-center/after-school/evaluations/Documents/After-School-Programs-for-High-School-Students-An-Evaluation-of-After-School-Matters.pdf

[4] Goldschmidt, Pete and Huang, Denise. “The Long-Term Effects of After-School Programming on Educational Adjustment and Juvenile Crime: A Study of the LA’s BEST After-School Program”. National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST) University of California, Los Angeles

http://www.lasbest.org/what/publications/LASBEST_DOJ_Final%20Report.pdf

[5] Hirsch, Barton J., Hedges, Larry V., Stawicki, JulieAnn, Mekinda, Megan A.“After-School Programs for High School Students An Evaluation of After School Matters”. June 2011. pg. 4

http://www.wallacefoundation.org/knowledge-center/after-school/evaluations/Documents/After-School-Programs-for-High-School-Students-An-Evaluation-of-After-School-Matters.pdf